University of Pittsburgh

 

University of Pittsburgh is a Winner of the 2016 Global Sustainable Development Award and Accredited as a Global 500 Sustainable Development Agencies of the year 2016 in appreciation of its contribution towards social-economic development of the world and its contribution towards attainment of United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Recognised for its commitment to promote and uphold International best practices and standards such as respect for rights of workers, quality products and services,payment of taxes,Regulatory compliance,environmental protection,Supporting productive corporate social responsibility,eliminating corruption,employment and remuneration of employees,etc.Awarded and Accredited by Public Opinions International (East Africa) and International Development Study Group. 

 

The Global Sustainable Development Award is not just for big agencies,corporations or NGOs, Its is for any agency from public and private sector in any part of the world which has made tremendous contributions towards community development as well as attainment of Sustainable Development and Peace.This Award is also for agencies which are committed towards attainment of the United Nations Sustainable Development.

The University of Pittsburgh has an endownment fund of 3.5 Billion USD and it has an annual operation budget of 2 Billion USD in which 800 Million USD is for strategic research.It operated as Pittsburgh Academy (1787–1819),and Western University of Pennsylvania (1819–1908) before adopting University of Pittsburgh.

Founded by Hugh Henry Brackenridge as Pittsburgh Academy in 1787, the University of Pittsburgh is one of the few universities and colleges established in the 18th century in the United States. It is the oldest continuously chartered institution of learning in the U.S. west of the Allegheny Mountains.The school began as a preparatory school, presumably in a log cabin, possibly as early as 1770 in Western Pennsylvania, then a frontier.

Brackenridge obtained a charter for the school from the state legislature of theCommonwealth of Pennsylvania on February 28, 1787, just ten weeks before the opening of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.A brick building was erected in 1790 on the south side of Third Street and Cherry Alley for the Pittsburgh Academy.The small two-story brick building, with a gable facing the alley, contained three rooms.

Within a short period, more advanced education in the area was needed, so in 1819 the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania amended the school's 1787 charter to confer university status. The school took the name the Western University of Pennsylvania, or WUP, and was intended to be the western sister institution to the University of Pennsylvania inPhiladelphia. By 1830, WUP had moved into a new three-story, freestone-fronted building, with Ionic columns and a cupola, near its original buildings fronting the south side of Third Street, between Smithfield Street and Cherry Alley in downtown Pittsburgh. By the 1830s, the university faced severe financial pressure to abandon its traditional liberal education in favor of the state legislature's desire for it to provide more vocational training. The decision to remain committed to liberal education nearly killed the university, but it persevered despite its abandonment by the city and state.It was also during this era that the founder of Mellon Bank, Thomas Mellon (Class of 1837), graduated and later taught at WUP.

The university's buildings, along with most of its records and files, were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1845 that wiped out 20 square blocks of Pittsburgh. Classes were temporarily held in Trinity Church until a new building was constructed on Duquesne Way (on what was the site of the former Horne's department store). Only four years later, in 1849, this building also was destroyed by fire. Due to the catastrophic nature of these fires, operations were suspended for a few years to allow the university time to regroup and rebuild. By 1854, WUP had erected a new building on the corner of Ross and Diamond (now Forbes Avenue) streets (site of the present day City-County building) and classes resumed in 1855. It is during this era, in 1867, that Samuel Pierpont Langley, astronomer, inventor, aviation pioneer and future Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, was chosen as director of the Allegheny Observatory that was donated to WUP in 1865. Langley was professor of astronomy and physics and remained at WUP until 1891, when he was succeeded by another prominent astronomer, James Keeler. Growing quickly during this period, WUP outgrew its downtown facilities and the university moved its campus to Allegheny City (present-day North Side).

                                                                                                   The Cathedral of Learning, the centerpiece of Pitt's campus and the tallest educational building in the Western Hemisphere

The university eventually found itself on a 10-acre (4.0 ha) site on the North Side's Observatory Hill at the location of its Allegheny Observatory. There, it constructed two new buildings, Science Hall and Main Hall, that were occupied by 1889 and 1890 respectively. During this era, the first collegiate football team was formed at Pitt in 1889. In 1892, the Western Pennsylvania Medical College was amalgamated into the university. By 1893, the university had graduated its first African-American, William Dammond.In 1895 WUP established its School of Law, and Andrew Carnegie and George Westinghouse were elected to the Board of Trustees, where they joined Andrew Mellon who had been elected in 1894. The Pittsburgh College of Pharmacy and Pittsburgh Dental School also joined the university in 1896. In 1898, the first women, sisters Margaret and Stella Stein, graduated from the university.During this period, University engineering professor Reginald Fessendenwas conducting pioneering work in radio broadcasting. By 1904, playing at Exposition Park, the university had its first undefeated football team

The University of Pittsburgh (commonly referred to as Pitt) is a state-related research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1787 after the American Revolutionary War, it was founded on the edge of the American frontier as the Pittsburgh Academy. It developed and was renamed as Western University of Pennsylvania by a change to its charter in 1819. After surviving two devastating fires and various relocations within the area, the school moved to its current location in the Oakland neighborhood of the city; it was renamed as the University of Pittsburgh in 1908. For most of its history, Pitt was a private institution, until 1966 when it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education.

The university is composed of 17 undergraduate and graduate schools and colleges located at its urban Pittsburgh campus, home to the university's central administration and 28,766 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. The university also includes four undergraduate schools located at campuses within Western Pennsylvania:Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, and Titusville. The 132-acre Pittsburgh campus has multiple contributing historic buildings of the Schenley Farms Historic District, most notably its 42-story Gothic revival centerpiece, the Cathedral of Learning. The campus is situated adjacent to the flagship medical facilities of its closely affiliated University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), as well as the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Schenley Park, and Carnegie Mellon University.

The university has an annual operating budget of approximately $2 billion, which includes nearly $900 million in research and development expenditures. A member of the Association of American Universities, Pitt is the sixth-largest recipient of federally sponsored research funding among U.S. universities in 2013, and it is a major recipient of research funding from the National Institutes of Health.It is the second-largest non-government employer in the Pittsburgh region behind UPMC. Pitt is ranked among the top public universities in the United States in both domestic and international rankings,and has been listed as a "best value" in higher education by several publications

Pitt students have access to various arts programs throughout the campus and city, and can participate in over 400 student clubs and organizations. Pitt's varsity athletic teams, collectively known as the Pittsburgh Panthers, compete in Division I of the NCAA, primarily as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

THE ARIAL VIEW OF UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

State relations to present day

In 1966, Pitt was designated by Pennsylvania as a state-related university. As such, Pitt receives public funds ($185.4 million in fiscal year 2011) covering about 9% of its operating budget, and offers reduced tuition to Pennsylvania residents. Pitt retains independent control, but is typically categorized as a public university. Upon affiliation with the state, subsidized tuition led to a massive influx of new students and rapid expansion of Pitt's size and scope. In the 1970s, Pitt's football team returned to greatness with a national championship season in 1976 led by Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett and continued success in the 1980s with players such as Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino. In the 1980s, significant medical research in the field of organ transplantation was conducted by Thomas Starzl, establishing Pitt as the world leader in the field of organ transplantation. In 1991, chancellor Wesley Posvar retired after 24 years in office. His administration is best known for elimination of the university's debt from its 1960s financial crisis and for increasing the school's prestige and endowment. Under Posvar, Pitt's operating budget grew sevenfold to $630 million and its endowment tripled to $257 million

Mark Nordenberg was chancellor of the university from 1995 to 2014 and led Pitt through a period of substantial progress, including a $2-billion capital-raising campaign that is over three quarters of the way toward achieving its goal and a $1-billion 12-year facilities plan.Major initiatives and events that have occurred during his tenure include the construction of the Petersen Events Center, a major expansion of on-campus housing, the growth of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the restructuring of its relationship with the university, and a series of disruptive bomb threats that occurred in 2012.

Patrick D. Gallagher was named the 18th chancellor of the university and assumed the office on August 1, 2014.

CAMPUS

The University of Pittsburgh's main campus comprises approximately 132 urban acres (0.53 km2) located in Pittsburgh's historic Oakland neighborhood. Much of the campus, including its centerpiece 42-story Cathedral of Learning, falls within the Oakland Civic Center/Schenley Farms National Historic District.The campus has been noted for its impressive architecture,and contains an eclectic mix of architecture that includes Greek revival, Neogothic, Italian Renaissance, and modern. It has been termed "a theme park of replica buildings, representing the architecture of the past speaking to the present."The campus has won multiple Green Star Awards from the Professional Grounds Management Society.

The University of Pittsburgh's main campus contains four contiguous sections: upper (sports complexes, residence halls); mid (Benedum, Chevron, Allen and Thaw Halls); lower (Cathedral of Learning, Union, Posvar Hall); and on the west end of campus, the medical center complex. The campus is bordered by Darragh Street/McKee Place to the west and Bellefield Avenue/Dithridge Street to the east; Forbes and Fifth avenues traverse the campus from west to east. Although generally within walking distance, the university also runs a bus and shuttle service between various campus locations and bordering neighborhoods.

The main campus is within walking distance of many recreational, cultural, and educational institutions in the Oakland neighborhood. The campus is adjacent to Schenley Plaza, the main branch of the Carnegie Public Library, the Carnegie Museums of Natural History and Art and the Carnegie Music Hall, as well as portions of Carnegie Mellon University. Carlow University is just west of campus, adjacent to the university's medical center complexes. The main quad of Carnegie Mellon University, Central Catholic High School, and historic Schenley Park, site of the Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Gardens, lie across Junction Hollow on the east end.

UNIVERSITY OF PITSBURGH MEDICAL CENTRE


The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), which is consistently ranked in U.S. News & World Report's "Honor Roll" of America's top hospitals, consists of the following hospitals and facilities in the Oakland area, many of which have shared use with various university departments: UPMC Presbyterian Hospital, UPMC Montefiore Hospital, Magee-Women's Hospital of UPMC, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Thomas Detre Hall, Eye and Ear Institute, Forbes Tower (home to theSchool of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences), Iroquois Building, Kaufman Medical Building, Medical Arts Building, 230 McKee Place, and UPMC University Center. UPMC academic hospitals and facilities that are scattered elsewhere throughout the city include the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC campus in the Lawrencevville neighborhood, the UPMC Sports Performance Complex on the South Side, and UPMC Shadyside and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute in the Hillman Cancer Center both located in the Shadyside neighborhood adjacent to Oakland.

 

OTHER CAMPUSES

Regional campuses offer master's, bachelor's, and associate degrees at four locations in Western Pennsylvania. They also allow students to take preliminary courses and relocate to other regional campuses or the Oakland campus to complete their degrees. They offer several degrees and certificates:

COMMUNITY IMPACTS

The University of Pittsburgh has been noted for both its role in community outreach and its impact on the economy of the city and the Western Pennsylvania region. In 2009, Pitt was ranked second overall, and the top public university in the nation, as a "Best Neighbor" for positive impact on its urban community, including both commercial and residential activities such as revitalization, cultural renewal, economics, and community service and development according to the "Saviors of Our Cities" ranking.Pitt was also listed as a "best neighbor" in the previous ranking released in 2006.These rankings reflect the statistics that each year Pitt spends more than $1.7 billion in the community and supports nearly 33,800 jobs in Allegheny County. The university is the Pittsburgh region's second largest non-government employer behind its affiliated University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC).Pitt's research program alone imports more than $822 million into the region each year (more than $3.60 for each $1 of state appropriations), and supports some 23,100 local jobs.Pitt students also spend more than $213 million on goods, services, and rental payments within the local economy.Pitt ranked sixth in the number of startups spawned by technologies developed by its researchers according to Association of University Technology Managers.

Pitt and its medical school are the academic partners of the closely affiliated the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. With over 55,000 employees and $10 billion in annual revenue, UPMC is the largest non-government employer in Pennsylvania.

Through the Pitt Volunteer Pool, faculty and staff members donate more than 10,000 hours annually to community service projects for agencies such as the Salvation Army, Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force, and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

Pitt also is a leading producer of Peace Corps volunteers.According to the Peace Corps' 2008 ranking of colleges and universities, only 14 schools in the nation produced more Peace Corp volunteers.Pitt's graduate school also ranked 10th for most alumni Peace Corps volunteers.

 

ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANISATION

The university was chartered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1787 and it operated as a fully private institution until an alteration to its charter in 1966 at which point it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education. This conferred "state-related" status to the university making it a legal instrument of the Commonwealth which provides an annual financial appropriation, currently 7.7% of the university's total operating budget, in exchange for the university offering tuition discounts to students that are residents of Pennsylvania. Legally, however, the university remains a private entity, operating under its nonprofit corporate charter, governed by its independent Board of Trustees, and with its assets under its own ownership and control. Therefore, it retains the freedom and individuality of a private institution, both administratively and academically, setting its own standards for admissions, awarding of degrees, faculty qualifications, teaching, and staff hiring.

The University's Board of Trustees maintains ultimate legal authority, governance, and responsibility for the university but specifically reserves authority over selecting the university's Chancellor; approval of major policies, particularly those related to the fiduciary responsibilities of the board; and the definition of the university's mission and goals. It is made up of 36 voting members: Chancellor, 17 Term Trustees elected by the board, 6 Alumni Trustees elected by the board on nomination from the Alumni Association Board of Directors, and 12 Commonwealth trustees. The Governor of Pennsylvania, the President Pro Tempore of the Pennsylvania Senate, and the Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives each appoints four of the 12 Commonwealth trustees. Additional non-voting trustees include 14 Special Trustees and additional Emeritus Trustees selected by the board. Non-voting ex-officio members include the Governor of Pennsylvania, the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the Chief Executive of Allegheny County, and the Mayor of Pittsburgh. There are three or more regular meetings of the Board of Trustees per year.

The Board of Trustees selects the university's Chancellor, who doubles as the chief academic officer and the Chief Executive Officer of the university as well as serving as an ex officio voting member of the Board of Trustees. The Chancellor is delegated with general administrative, academic, and management authority over the university. Under the Chancellor are the Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor, the Senior Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, the deans of the various schools, the presidents of the regional campuses, department chairs, and the directors of University centers and institutes.The university is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

ACADEMICS

Throughout its history, Pitt has been committed to a liberal arts education with a well-rounded curriculum in the arts, sciences, and humanities.Pitt has an increasing emphasis on undergraduate research experience and for providing real-world opportunities such as co-ops and internships.Undergraduate degrees can be earned as Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Philosophy. Along with providing certificate programs, graduate level master's, professional, and doctoral degrees are also awarded. Pitt has also initiated a University-wide Outside the Classroom Curriculum (OCC) that includes a structured series of extracurricular programs and experiences designed to complement students' academic studies and help develop personal attributes and professional skills.Students who complete the OCC requirements receive an OCC "transcript" and a green cord of distinction to wear at commencement.

The freshman level entry schools include the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business Administration, the Swanson School of Engineering, and the School of Nursing.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Pitt's history of commitment to international education is illustrated by its unique collection of 30 Nationality Rooms on the first and third floors of the Cathedral of Learning. As a further demonstration of this commitment, Pitt is one of the country's leading producers of both Fulbright scholars and Peace Corps volunteers and one of fewer than 20 American universities to claim five or more area studies programs that have been competitively designated as National Resource Centers by the U.S. Department of Education.

Pitt's National Resource Centers include Asian, European, Latin American, Russian and East European, and Global studies,as well as Pitt's International Business Center. In addition, Pitt's Asian Studies Center has been awarded status as a Confucius Institute by the Chinese Ministry of Education.Further, Pitt is home to one of just ten European Union Centers of Excellence in the U.S., funded by the European Commission.

 

Reputational Rankings

Pitt ranks in the top 10 percent in teaching, the top 20 percent in research, and the top 10 percent in citations in the 2016 edition of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings of the world's top 800 universities.

Pitt is included in the Princeton Review's 2017 listing of The Best 381 Colleges, which features the top 15 percent of the nation's four-year colleges.

For the 11th consecutive year (2016), Kiplinger's Personal Finance ranks Pitt ranks as the top value among all public colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. Pitt also was the only Pennsylvania public college or university included in The Princeton Review-USA TODAY national "Best Value Colleges for 2014" list, based on academic quality, cost, and financial aid.

Pitt is the world's top university for philosophy, according to the 2016 QS World University Rankings. Pitt also was highly rated for nursing (No. 12) and medicine (No. 46).

Thomson Reuters ranked Pitt 30th on its list of the world's 100 most innovative universities in 2015, based on such criteria as research output and patent filings.

In 2015, College Factual ranked Pitt as the best U.S. school to study health professions, based on graduates' earnings, strength of academic majors, and the number and quality of other closely related majors on campus, program accredications, and overall institutional quality.

In its 2015 Guide to 353 Green Colleges, The Princeton Review ranked Pitt among the most environmentally responsible colleges in the United States and Canada. Also this year, Sierramagazine has again named Pitt as one of America's "Cool Schools" for its commitment to environmentalism.

The Princeton Review also highlighted Pitt in its 2015 Colleges That Create Futures: 50 Schools That Launch Careers By Going Beyond the Classroom, a guide to higher-education institutions that combine career-focused learning with academic excellence.

Pitt ranks No. 22 in the world among 2,000 colleges and universities for the quality and quantity of its scholarly publications, according to 2013-14 statistics released by the University Ranking by Academic Performance Research Laboratory. Pitt placed 16th nationally and 7th among U.S. public universities.

In recognition of its strong commitment to economic engagement, Pitt was designated in 2014 as an Innovation and Economic Prosperity University by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

Calling Pitt "a world class research university" with an "unwavering commitment to excellence," a Middle States Commission on Higher Education accreditation report in September 2012 reaccredited the University for a 10-year period, without qualification, the maximum permissible time for an extension of accreditation.

Funded Research

Pitt ranks ninth nationally in federal science and engineering funding, according to a report from the National Science Foundation. Pitt ranks fifth among U.S. universities in terms of the competitive grants awarded to members of its faculty by the National Institutes of Health.

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International Development Study Group

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